Groundwater Contamination

Groundwater Contamination

Groundwater Contamination

The pollution of groundwater is a serious matter, particularly in areas where aquifers provide a large part of the water supply. One common source of groundwater pollution is sewage. Its sources include an ever increasing number of septic tanks, as well as inadequate or broken sewer systems and farm wastes.

If sewage water that is contaminated with bacteria enters the groundwater system, it may become purified through natural processes. The harmful bacteria may be mechanically filtered by the sediment through which the water percolates, destroyed by chemical oxidation, and/or assimilated by other organisms. For purification to occur, however, the aquifer must be of the correct composition.

For example, extremely permeable aquifers (such as highly fractured crystalline rock, coarse gravel, or cavernous limestone) have such large openings that contaminated groundwater may travel long distances without being filtered and cleansed. In this case, the water flows too rapidly and is not in contact with the surrounding material long enough for purification to occur. This is the problem at well 1 in Figure 1A.

Comparing two aquifers In this example, the limestone aquifer allowed the contamination to reach a well, but the sandstone aquifer did not.
Figure 1 – Comparing two aquifers In this example, the limestone aquifer allowed the contamination to reach a well, but the sandstone aquifer did not.

On the other hand, when the aquifer is composed of sand or permeable sandstone, it can sometimes be purified after traveling only a few dozen meters through it.
The openings between sand grains are large enough to permit water movement, yet the movement of the water is slow enough to allow ample time for its purification (well 2, Figure 1B).

Sometimes sinking a well can lead to groundwater pollution problems. If the well pumps a sufficient quantity of water, the cone of depression will locally increase the slope of the water table. In some instances, the original slope may even be reversed. This could lead to the contamination of wells that yielded unpolluted water before heavy pumping began (Figure 2).

Changing direction Drawdown at the heavily pumped well changed the slope of the water table, which led to the contamination of the small well.
Figure 2 – Changing direction Drawdown at the heavily pumped well changed the slope of the water table, which led to the contamination of the small well.

Also recall that the rate of groundwater movement increases as the slope of the water table gets steeper. This could produce problems because a faster rate of movement allows less time for the water to be purified in the aquifer before it is pumped to the surface.

Other sources and types of contamination also threaten groundwater supplies (Figure 3).

Potential sources of contamination Sometimes materials leached from landfills and leaking gasoline storage tanks contaminate an aquifer.
Figure 3 – Potential sources of contamination Sometimes materials leached from landfills and leaking gasoline storage tanks contaminate an aquifer.

These include widely used substances such as highway salt, fertilizers that are spread across the land surface, and pesticides. In addition, a wide array of chemicals and industrial materials may leak from pipelines, storage tanks, landfills, and holding ponds. Some of these pollutants are classified as hazardous, meaning that they are either flammable, corrosive, explosive, or toxic.

In landfills, potential contaminants are heaped onto mounds or spread directly over the ground. As rainwater oozes through the refuse, it may dissolve a variety of organic and inorganic materials. If the leached material reaches the water table, it will mix with the groundwater and contaminate the supply. Similar problems may result from leakage of shallow excavations called holding ponds into which a variety of liquid wastes are disposed.

Because groundwater movement is usually slow, polluted water can go undetected for a long time. In fact, contamination is sometimes discovered only after drinking water has been affected and people become ill. By this time, the volume of polluted water may be very large, and even if the source of contamination is removed immediately, the problem is not solved. Although the sources of groundwater contamination are numerous, there are relatively few solutions.

Once the source of the problem has been identified and eliminated, the most common practice is simply to abandon the water supply and allow the pollutants to be flushed away gradually. This is the least costly and easiest solution, but the aquifer must remain unused for many years. To accelerate this process, polluted water is sometimes pumped out and treated. Following removal of the tainted water, the aquifer is allowed to recharge naturally, or in some cases the treated water or other freshwater is pumped back in. This process is costly, time-consuming, and may be risky because there is no way to be certain that all of the contamination has been removed. Clearly, the most effective solution to groundwater contamination is prevention.

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