Parícutin, a wellknown cinder cone_Volcanoes

Cinder Cones

Describe the formation, size, and composition of cinder cones.

As the name suggests, cinder cones (also called scoria cones) are built from ejected lava fragments that begin to harden in flight to produce the vesicular rock scoria (Figure 1). These pyroclastic fragments range in size from fine ash to bombs that may exceed 1 meter (3 feet) in diameter.
However, most of the volume of a cinder cone consists of pea- to walnut sized fragments that are markedly vesicular and have a black to reddish brown color. In addition, this pyroclastic material tends to have basaltic composition.

Cinder cones Cinder cones are built from ejected lava fragments (mostly cinders and bombs) and are relatively small—usually less than 300 meters (1000 feet)—in height.
Figure 1 – Cinder cones Cinder cones are built from ejected lava fragments (mostly cinders and bombs) and are relatively small—usually less than 300 meters (1000 feet)—in height.

Although cinder cones are composed mostly of loose scoria fragments, some produce extensive lava fields. These lava flows generally form in the final stages of the volcano’s life span, when the magma body has lost most of its gas content. Because cinder cones are composed of loose fragments rather than solid rock, the lava usually flows out from the unconsolidated base of the cone rather than from the crater.

A cinder cone has a very simple, distinct shape that is determined by the slope the loose pyroclastic material maintains as it comes to rest (Figure 1). Because cinders have a high angle of repose (the steepest angle at which material remains stable), cinder cones are steep-sided, having slopes between 30 and 40 degrees. In addition, a cinder cone has quite a large, deep crater in relation to the overall size of the structure. Although relatively symmetrical, some cinder cones are elongated and higher on the side that was downwind during the final eruptive phase.

Most cinder cones are produced by a single, shortlived eruptive event. One study found that half of all cinder cones examined were constructed in less than 1 month, and 95 percent formed in less than 1 year.

Once the event ceases, the magma in the “plumbing” connecting the vent to the magma source solidifies, and the volcano usually does not erupt again. (One exception is Cerro Negro, a cinder cone in Nicaragua, which has erupted more than 20 times since it formed in 1850.) As a consequence of this typically short life span, cinder cones are small, usually between 30 and 300 meters (100 and 1000 feet) tall. A few rare examples exceed 700 meters (2300 feet) in height.

Cinder cones number in the thousands around the globe. Some occur in groups, such as the volcanic field near Flagstaff, Arizona, which consists of about 600 cones. Others are parasitic cones that are found on the flanks or within the calderas of larger volcanic structures.

Parícutin: Life of a Garden-Variety Cinder Cone

One of the very few volcanoes studied by geologists from its very beginning is a cinder cone called Parícutin, located about 320 kilometers (200 miles) west of Mexico City. In 1943, its eruptive phase began in a cornfield owned by Dionisio Pulido, who witnessed the event.
For 2 weeks prior to the first eruption, numerous tremors caused apprehension in the nearby village of Parícutin. Then, on February 20, sulfurous gases began billowing from a small depression that had been in the cornfield for as long as local residents could remember.
During the night, hot, glowing rock fragments were ejected from the vent, producing a spectacular fireworks display. Explosive discharges continued, throwing hot fragments and ash occasionally as high as 6000 meters (20,000 feet) into the air. Larger fragments fell near the crater, some remaining incandescent as they rolled down the slope. These built an aesthetically pleasing cone, while finer ash fell over a much larger area, burning and eventually covering the village of Parícutin. In the first day, the cone grew to 40 meters (130 feet), and by the fifth day it was more than 100 meters (330 feet) high.
The first lava flow came from a fissure that opened just north of the cone, but after a few months, flows began to emerge from the base of the cone. In June 1944, a clinkery aa flow 10 meters (30 feet) thick moved over much of the village of San Juan Parangaricutiro, leaving only the church steeple exposed (Figure 2). After 9 years of intermittent pyroclastic explosions and nearly continuous discharge of lava from vents at its base, the activity ceased almost as quickly as it had begun. Today, Parícutin is just another one of the scores of cinder cones dotting the landscape in this region of Mexico. Like the others, it will not erupt again.

Parícutin, a wellknown cinder cone
The village of San Juan Parangaricutiro was engulfed by aa lava from Parícutin. The church steeple remains.
Figure 2 – Parícutin, a wellknown cinder cone
The village of San Juan Parangaricutiro was engulfed by aa lava from Parícutin. The church steeple remains. (Photos by Michael Collier)

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